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5 Simple Ways to Add Flaxseeds to Your Diet for Weight Management

Regularly eating flaxseeds can support weight management and overall good health. Problem is, many people just don’t know how to eat them. If you’re trying to incorporate flaxseeds into your diet, at first glance you might very well be intimidated by the way they look. After all, flaxseeds come in brown and golden colors and even in whole and ground form. So, if you’re in need of some good ideas, here are five quick and easy ways to get flaxseeds in your diet, particularly for weight management.

Related Article: Understanding the Process of Weight Management

1. Add a Sprinkle to Whole Grain Cereals

In and of themselves, whole grain cereals like oatmeal are weight loss “superfoods” and natural appetite suppressants. You can top off your favorite cereals with whole or ground flaxseeds to increase their satiating effects and overall nutritional value. I prefer adding golden ground flaxseeds to my oatmeal or plain Cheerios as it tends to dissolve easily. Doing so provides a substantial dose of fiber, which promotes slow digestion and absorption, making you feel fuller, sooner and for a longer period of time.

Related Article: Oatmeal Basics: Understanding the Differences Between Oats

2. Use Them to Give Your Salads a Nutty Flavor

Those of you who either know or follow me are probably aware that I’m an absolute sucker for a large, nutrient-rich salad. Salads are great for weight loss, as they’re relatively low in calories and house sizable amounts of vegetables, healthy fats, and high-quality protein. I prefer to use whole brown flaxseeds in my salads, as they give a taste and texture that’s very similar to crushed nuts or sunflower seeds. Take the first step and try them in my “Lettuce-Less Salad”.

Related Article: Unbelievably Delicious Ways to Build a Healthy Salad

3. Drop a Spoonful in Your Favorite Yogurt

Regular consumption of yogurt can reduce hunger, increase fullness, and even help prevent overeating throughout the day. This holds especially true for strained yogurts (Greek- and Icelandic-style). Although these yogurts are naturally rich in protein, calcium, probiotics and other nutritious ingredients, flaxseeds can supply a whopping dose of health-promoting omega-3 fatty acids. I absolutely love the taste of whole golden flaxseed with fresh berries in my Siggi’s Icelandic-style yogurt.

Related Article: Why I’ve Swapped Out Greek Yogurt for Icelandic Skyr

4. Blend Some in Your Smoothies

When prepared the right way, smoothies can help you lose weight while also supplying a multitude of antioxidants and phytonutrients to boost your body’s disease-fighting potential. Smoothies are also an excellent way to get more flaxseeds in your diet, which can further promote weight loss. Simply throw 1-2 tablespoons of whole or ground flaxseeds into your blender for added protein, healthy fats, and fiber. I prefer adding golden ground flaxseed to recipes like my “Potassium Punch” smoothie.

Related Article: 5 Simple and Delicious Low-Sugar Smoothie Recipes for People with Diabetes

5. Experiment with Flaxseed-Based Products

There are tons of wholesome products on the market that contain substantial amounts of dietary flaxseeds including whole grain cereals and breads. Flaxseed-based crisp breads, are another option. Wasa Flax Seed Crisp Bread, for instance, pairs well with fresh vegetables, fruit, lean meats, and low-fat dairy spreads. This brand is one of my favorites to enjoy with fresh avocado, goat cheese or as a bread-like side dish for salads.

And there you have it! Five simple (and delicious) ways to get more flaxseeds in your diet. Now, it’s not completely understood whether or not flaxseed oil and other flaxseed-derived supplements offer the same health benefits as dietary flaxseeds. But, these may be a good start if you’re still leery about them.

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Disclaimer: The information provided is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a physician for advice.

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